Life Told Backward

Since August 2018 I've lived in Mitaka, Japan, on the campus of Japan Lutheran College and Theological Seminary, where my husband Andrew L. Wilson is Professor of Church History. I serve as one of the pastors at Tokyo Lutheran Church near the Shin-Ōkubo station in central Tokyo.

From July 2016 to July 2018 we lived in St. Paul, Minnesota, getting reacquainted with our home territory in between international sojourns. During that period I wrote a memoir about the year I spent in the newborn Republic of Slovakia when I was 17.

From 2008 to 2016 we lived in Strasbourg, France, where I worked at the Institute for Ecumenical Research, a close affiliate of the Lutheran World Federation, specializing in Eastern Orthodoxy and Pentecostalism. I continue to serve as a Visiting Professor of the Institute and, as such, the Consultant to the International Lutheran-Pentecostal Dialogue.

In 2010, Andrew and I followed the footsteps of Martin Luther's pilgrimage from Germany to Rome five hundred (or maybe four hundred ninety-nine) years earlier.

I earned a Ph.D. in Systematic Theology in 2008 and an M.Div. in 2003 at Princeton Theological Seminary. During that time, Andrew and I got married and became parents to Zeke. I served as pastor at a Slovak-American church in Trenton, New Jersey, and became the editor of Lutheran Forum, an independent theological quarterly, which I continued to do until the end of 2018.

Before graduate school I spent one year working at First Things, where I first started publishing theological essays. Since my first in October 1998, I've published over one hundred articles in popular venues like Christianity Today, The Christian Century, and Books & Culture, as well as scholarly journals like Pro Ecclesia, Pneuma, Lutheran Quarterly, and Concordia Journal. I've also published three books, with more to come.

I got a B.A. in Theology and Philosophy from Lenoir-Rhyne College (which has since upgraded to Lenoir-Rhyne University).

Between high school and college I spent the aforementioned year living in Slovakia with my parents and brother, where I learned to chatter in Slovak about food, piety, and boys.

I did my growing up in New York and New Jersey and still think of myself as a New Yorker, even though I haven't lived there since the last millennium.